Signs of Hearing Loss

Child Health Day: Early Signs of Hearing Loss

Photo Courtesy of Today Show

Photo Courtesy of Today Show

Hearing loss in infants is a hidden disability. Infants can't express themselves or alert parents that there is a problem. That's why it's important for parents to understand and look for signs of hearing loss. Some of these include:

Newborn/Infant:

  • Not startling or awakening at loud noises (0-3 months)
  • Not calming at familiar voices (0-3 months)
  • Not responding (smiling, cooing) to your voice when spoken to (4-6 months)
  • Not turning toward sounds (4-9 months)
  • Not showing normal babbling development (4-9 months)

Baby/Toddler:

  • Not babbling different voices (9-15 months)
  • Not responding to his/her name (9-15 months)
  • Not responding to changes in your tone of voice (9-15 months)
  • Not repeating some sounds you make (9-15 months)

Regardless if your infant is showing signs of hearing loss, we hope that parents take advantage of our free hearing screenings next Tuesday in Crozet. The procedure is quick and painless for infants and provides peace of mind for parents. It's a win-win! 

More information about infant and childhood hearing loss can be found here on our web site. 

Are You Living Your Potential?

May is Better Hearing Month and a good reminder to have your hearing checked to make sure you're not missing out on life's precious moments.

Here are some common signs that you or someone you know may be experiencing hearing loss:

  • Difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments (e.g. restaurants, cars)
  • Complaining that people seem to "mumble" all of the time
  • Responding to questions inappropriately
  • Asking family, friends, or colleagues to repeat themselves often
  • Having trouble hearing people who are in another room or not directly facing you
  • Having trouble following phone conversations
  • People complaining that your TV is turned up too loud
  • Experiencing a ringing, buzzing or hissing sound in your ears

Do any of these sound familiar? If so, please don't hesitate to contact us or an audiologist you trust to schedule a screening and learn more. Hearing impairment can drastically decrease your quality of life, or the quality of life of someone that you care about. 

If you're not sure whether to make that first call, you can complete our questionnaire, and we can contact you instead.

For more information about the different types of hearing loss, visit the Hearing Information pages of our web site. 

Signs of Infant Hearing Loss

On Tuesday, May 24, our Crozet office location is partnering with Crozet Eye Care to offer free hearing and vision tests for infants ages 6-12 months. Virginia is a state that requires hearing screenings for all newborns; however, according to the American Academy of Audiology, these screenings may miss auditory neuropathy, mild hearing loss, those with cytomegalovirus (CMV) - a member of the herpes virus family that can be transferred to an infant at birth and is known to cause permanent hearing loss, and infants susceptible to diseases like otitis. 

Hearing loss in infants is a hidden disability. Infants can't express themselves or alert parents that there is a problem. That's why it's important for parents to understand and look for signs of hearing loss. Some of these include:

Newborn/Infant:

  • Not startling or awakening at loud noises (0-3 months)
  • Not calming at familiar voices (0-3 months)
  • Not responding (smiling, cooing) to your voice when spoken to (4-6 months)
  • Not turning toward sounds (4-9 months)
  • Not showing normal babbling development (4-9 months)

Baby/Toddler:

  • Not babbling different voices (9-15 months)
  • Not responding to his/her name (9-15 months)
  • Not responding to changes in your tone of voice (9-15 months)
  • Not repeating some sounds you make (9-15 months)

Regardless if your infant is showing signs of hearing loss, we hope that parents take advantage of our free hearing screenings next Tuesday in Crozet. The procedure is quick and painless for infants and provides peace of mind for parents. It's a win-win! 

More information about infant and childhood hearing loss can be found here on our web site.